Wednesday, November 14, 2012

threefold designs = cross stitch, tapestry ... and now weaving!


Yes, a new medium to make up the trilogy!!! I have just ordered this little baby:


I have a few weeks off work at the end of the year, so guess what I will be doing??

I asked quite a few people, and the deciding factor (apart from the cost) was a helpful reply from Holly Berry, who learnt to weave on the fabulous Mastercrafts series. She said her first loom was the Ashford 8 Shaft Table Loom - after 2 years she bought a 24-shaft Arm Loom for her studio, but said she still uses the Ashford for developing, sampling and experimenting. If you haven't seen the show, it's available on DVD ;)

I already have one of these ready:


Aaaaand a couple of 'how to weave' books on order! All I need now is a table (hello Ikea!) ... I have plenty of scrap yarn to practice on.

I have a 'to do' list to complete before I start learning how to weave ... consisting mainly of tidying the studio (incl. unpacking) and finishing off assembling our bed head (which is currently in pieces in the studio).

And of course, I will be documenting my progress right here! I'm sure the first step of putting the loom together and warping it up will be accompanied by much cursing ;)


10 comments:

  1. You are in for a whole world of cursing. :-) I've been cursing at a wide variety of looms for 5 years now and still loving it. Ashford make nice things, I have one of their wheels

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Andrew, I was just looking at your blog today!

      Yes, I'm hoping that weaving will be less stressful than tapestry ... though warping the loom looks a lot harder!

      Delete
    2. When making your warp on the stakes don't put it on too tightly. As the pegs will bend in towards each other towards the end of the warp making it slacker down one side than the other. Trufax. The top-cross is all-important, the bottom cross you use as a guide or for raddling. Make a whole bunch of short narrow warps for practice. Lots of little warps is better than a few big ones, because the weaving is easy, but the warping is difficult. Trufax.

      Also, there are different warping methods, I personally favour beaming the warp then threading it through heddle, then reed, but many folks prefer to go the other way and I understand it's better for table looms, so yeah.

      Delete
    3. Thanks Andrew - I will definitely follow you advice ... I don't want to be overwhelmed when warping up for the first time!! ;)

      Delete
  2. I have put up a weave on a full size floor Loom once and I cursed a few times, even if I had some help from my late mother in law. The easy part is weaving ;). I'm so curious about what you will create on your new loom!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too Therese!! Do you still weave? I'd love to see what you have created ;)

      Delete
  3. I want to know where you get your 56 hour days, Michelle. Mine only seem to have 11 or 12... but seriously, enjoy the new - shall I call it - sport?
    Incidentally I solved my lack of a large tapestry loom by finding a bed (see my blog)!

    Happy weaving.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh wow, I just had a peek at your blog - that is brilliant!!

      And Misha, you should know by now that I am M.A.N.I.C. :P
      I really wish I didn't have to sleep at all ;)

      Delete
  4. Good luck Michelle, I agree with Misha, where do you get the time?? Our local Handweavers and Spinners Guild has beginners classes, maybe you can get in touch with yours, they may also have people in your area who could be of assistance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, we do have a local Guild - I might try teaching myself, then see if they have workshops if I get stuck! Only problem is, the local Guild seem to cater for those people who don't work full time, only offering classes during the day ... so much for encouraging younger people to get involved in textiles!!

      Delete